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Upgrading the Cyberstorm PPC from 68040 to 68060 CPU

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The Cyberstorm PPC Turbocard from 1997 for the Amiga 3000/4000 comes with two CPU's in different configurations: 1. CPU: Motorola 68040 or 68060 2. CPU: PowerPC 604e @ 150 / 180 / 200 / 233 MHz In this tutorial we want to describe how to change the Motorola 68040 with a 68060 CPU. Overview: Cyberstorm PPC with a 68040 and 180 MHz PowerPC CPU Step by step Guide: Install (copy) 68060.library and 68040_dummy.library to Libs: Rename or delete the original 68040.library in Libs: Rename the 68040_dummy.library to 68040.library Shut down the Amiga 4000 Unplug the Cyberstorm PPC card from the mainboard Remove the heatsink and cooler of the PowerPC CPU and also the memory modules (for better accessibility) Extract the 68040 CPU carefully with this tool; don't use a screwdriver!!! (be aware that this is a BGA socket => very vulnerable) Intel Chip Remover tool Now you can see the voltage selector jumper in the center of the socket 5V (68040) and 3.3V (68060) voltage selector jumper D

Amiga 1000

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General The Amiga 1000 was the first computer in a series of very powerful and successful machines of the mid 1980s until mid 1990s from Commodore! When the product was released in July, 1985 it was only called "Amiga" not before other models like the Amiga 500, 2000 were introduced, Commodore added the additional 1000 to distinguish between the others. Different Logo This short-lived logo was only used on the Amiga 1000. Amiga check-mark Logo Technical information Chip RAM Originally shipped to developers with 128 KB RAM with an option to extend it to 256 KB. End users got already the 256 KB version with the possibility to upgrade to 512 KB. Commodore Amiga 1000 with A1050 RAM upgrade (silver box) Maximum extendable to 8.5 MB total RAM (512KB Chip and 8MB Fast RAM) Chip RAM: Chipset (Agnus) can only access Chip RAM not Fast RAM Fast RAM: not accessable by Agnus chip but CPU CPU Motorola 68000 with 7.09379 MHz (PAL) or 7.15909 MHz (NTSC

C64 Breadbin Repair

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Few weeks ago I purchased a new Commodore C64 with Assy. Board 250407 Rev. B from 1983. My guess was that this machine had not been switched on for decades ;-) Nevertheless the visual conditions from this nearly 40 years old computer were quite good: Top view Rear view Back view with connectors Side view After turning on the C64 this output was displayed: colorful mix of letters  Mhmm, where could be the error? A good starting point is to measure the power inputs on the board: Measuring points, Source: forum64.de Blue = GND Red = +5V Yellow = +12V Nope, the input voltages are OK! Next it is a good idea to visit  The Pictorial C64 Fault Guide  to visually localize the error. So in my case it was hard to find a similar image, but after some research the best candidates are: PLA (U17) VIC II (U19) If you don't have working spare parts but an Arduino Uno there are a nice collection of test programs available ( C64 Test Tools  fro

Replace old fan of Amiga 1000

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If you face the issue of heavy noise it is strongly recommend to replace the old PSU fan with a new one or take it apart and use some lube on the friction bearing. Replacement A very good spare part to use is a EBM Papst fan: 115V or 230V variant. EBM Papst 8550N (230V): Link EBM Papst 8506N (115V): Link Instruction Starting situation: Open the Amiga 1000 and remove the metal shield Remove floppy drive and unplug all cables from the mainboard Take off the motherboard Now you can remove the PSU Open the case of the PSU and unplug the power connector of the fan Unscrew and remove the old fan Cut the connector cable off from the old fan and solder it together to the new one Screw the new Papst fan to the PSU Plug in the power connector of the fan Test it Close the case and rebuild your Amiga 1000 parts

Amiga Test Kit

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Summary Perfect diagnostic tool for your Amiga to test memory, keyboard, floppy, I/O devices, Audio, Chipset and some others! Here is a tutorial how to build it! If you are lazy or not interested in the details you can download the binaries here ! Build Amiga Test Kit (on Linux) Needed Downloads: binutils-2.28 ( Link ) gcc-7.1.0 ( Link ) Amiga Test Kit ( Link ) Extract them to a folder in your home directory e.g. /home/user/projects. (tar -xvjf binutils-2.28.tar.bz2, same with gcc) Configure for m68k ../binutils-2.28/configure --prefix=/path/to/install --target=m68k-unknown-elf Makefile will be created. Build with make && make install ../gcc-7.1.0/configure --prefix=/path/to/install --target=m68k-unknown-elf --enable-languages=c --disable-libssp Makefile will be created. Build with make && make install mpfr not found try this: ./contrib/download_prerequisites If everything worked like a charm you have to add the new binaries to your PATH vari

Amiga 1000 PSU recap

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If you have stability issues with your 34 years old Amiga 1000 it's a very good idea to check the output lines of the power supply: +12V,-5V and +5V! Plug pinout: Check with scope to also see ripple and noise or rough with a multimeter!                    Current Voltage      Min.    Max.             Stability        Ripple & Noise ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ +5V            2A         8A               +/- 5%           150 mV P-P +12V          0A         1A               +/- 5%           150 mV P-P -5V             0A          0.25A         +/- 5%           150 mV P-P When it comes out that the output values are too bad you have to replace the old capacitors of the PSU! For this you must disassemble the whole computer due the position of the power supply: I have the Shindengen CA1000PS/EC (PAL Version)! Documentation: Link If everything disassembled you should have this PCB: